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A patient foundation trust in Greater Manchester ‘requires improvement’


12 December 2016

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A major foundation trust serving more than a million patients in Greater Manchester ‘requires improvement’ according to its latest CQC inspection.

The Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust failed to meet a good standard in offering safe, effective and well-led care.

It currently offers provides mental health, community and specialist services to people living in Bury, Heywood, Middleton, Rochdale, Oldham, Tameside, Stockport, Glossop and Trafford in Greater Manchester.

A major foundation trust serving more than a million patients in Greater Manchester ‘requires improvement’ according to its latest CQC inspection.

The Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust failed to meet a good standard in offering safe, effective and well-led care.

It currently offers provides mental health, community and specialist services to people living in Bury, Heywood, Middleton, Rochdale, Oldham, Tameside, Stockport, Glossop and Trafford in Greater Manchester.

However, the trust was found to have violated Department of Health guidance on same sex accommodation on three wards for older adults and three for working age adults, risking the safety, privacy and dignity of the patients

Dr Paul Lelliot, deputy chief inspector of hospitals, mental health, said: “We were concerned that guidance on same sex accommodation was breached in a number of wards.

“We found concerns with the levels of training. Staff were not following the trust’s own policies to manage medicines in a number of services and we also found restrictions on patients’ liberty which had not been properly addressed.

However, he added that staff were respectful and professional and found multi-disciplinary staff teams that worked well across the trust both internally and with external agencies.

The trust was also rated as good in the areas of caring and responsive care, while the CAMHS wards were rated as outstanding.

Michael McCourt, chief executive of Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust, said the rating was a refection of the  “immense challenges we continue to face in providing complex care”.

He added that the trust would “need to work together with our patients, partners and commissioners to make demonstrable improvements”. 

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