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CQC failing to support new care models, MPs warned


6 December 2016

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NHS leaders have told MPs that the Care Quality Commission is lagging behind in its support of new models of care.

In written evidence to the Health Select Committee for their CQC accountability hearing, NHS Confederation said 69% of its membership are concerned that the care regulator is not making progress to support the vanguards.

NHS leaders have told MPs that the Care Quality Commission is lagging behind in its support of new models of care.

In written evidence to the Health Select Committee for their CQC accountability hearing, NHS Confederation said 69% of its membership are concerned that the care regulator is not making progress to support the vanguards.

Citing a recent member survey of 300 NHS leaders, the confederation added that 76% also disagreed that the CQC is supporting care providers to take innovative approaches.

The organisation added that by not supporting the vanguards and innovative approaches to care, the regulator runs the risk of creating “unnecessary barriers” to setting up the new care models.

The report said: “The development of new models of care is complex and happening at pace. New approaches to planning and delivering care can involve integration and risk-sharing across existing structures, or the creation of new organisations such as accountable care organisations.

“It is important that CQC supports members around these new models of care and does not create unnecessary barriers to their implementation.”

The evidence also said that the CQC is not “delivering value for money” as the regulator will only have a “modest reduction” in operation income by 2020/21.

The CQC has previously committed to moving towards a “light-touch” approach to regulation and inspection.

NHS Confederation said they expected this to “cost less due to the reduction in the number of comprehensive inspections taking place”.

A CQC spokesperson said the regulator has an important role to play in encouraging innovation "by flexibly and effectively registering and inspecting new models".

They said: “Our strategy for 2016-21 states our commitment to adapt to new models of care and work with others to support services to improve. Already this work is underway.

“For example, in the summer, we published our statement of intent, which expands on our approach in this area. Also, we have established regional networks of inspectors to support new models of care, so that it is easier for providers to work with us.

“Our supportive approach is designed to ensure regulation is not an unnecessary barrier to innovation, but continues to protect people from harm."

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