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DH releases first ‘official’ CCG funding pot


18 January 2012

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A multi-million pound cash injection has been promised to commissioning GPs to boost out of hours and urgent care services in their area.

This marks the first time funds have been officially delegated from PCTs to CCGs.

The £100m additional funding from the DH – or £2 per head – is said to have been made possible due to the "good management" of the department's central budgets.


A multi-million pound cash injection has been promised to commissioning GPs to boost out of hours and urgent care services in their area.

This marks the first time funds have been officially delegated from PCTs to CCGs.

The £100m additional funding from the DH – or £2 per head – is said to have been made possible due to the "good management" of the department's central budgets.

A multi-million pound cash injection has been promised to commissioning GPs to boost out of hours and urgent care services in their area.

This marks the first time funds have been officially delegated from PCTs to CCGs.

The £100m additional funding from the DH – or £2 per head – is said to have been made possible due to the "good management" of the department's central budgets.

Commissioners are being urged to use the funds to provide more effective cover for urgent care services; improve out of hours care; and extend practice opening times.

The DH has warned the money must not be spent on CCG running costs.

"The extra funds are a welcome boost during a demanding part of the year," said Dr Shane Gordon, CEO of North East Essex CCG.

"This is the first time that the Department has specifically identified funding for PCTs to delegate to prospective CCGs for patient care, although individual PCTs have been delegating elements of their commissioning funds to emerging CCGs and Pathfinders during 2011/12 as part of their development."

Your comments (terms and conditions apply):

"This investment could be targeted towards admission avoidance – e.g. D Dimer tests could clinically exclude the posibility of a PE or a DVT. Thus a secondary care assessment might be avoided. The key to managing OOH is to incentivise GP educators and Dr with BASICs skills to rolemodel and to buddy doctors learning to give telephone advice (better still is to get these doctors, expert patients and nurse practioners redesigning the whole service – so as to improve the patient experience and merge walk-in-centres with OOH services. There is too much duplication of work and too many different cultures of working Praxis (private providers and NHS staff have different ways of working) – Dr Nigel Roper, Essex

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