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Government orders review of 12 health and social care systems


5 July 2017

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The CQC will soon be inspecting local health and social care systems in 12 areas under the orders of the secretaries of state for health and communities and local government.

The reviews will cover commissioning between health and social care and an assessment of the governance in place for managing resources.

The CQC has said the inspections will also look at how patients move between health and social care, including delayed transfers of care for people over 65 years old.

The CQC will soon be inspecting local health and social care systems in 12 areas under the orders of the secretaries of state for health and communities and local government.

The reviews will cover commissioning between health and social care and an assessment of the governance in place for managing resources.

The CQC has said the inspections will also look at how patients move between health and social care, including delayed transfers of care for people over 65 years old.

However, critics have said the review runs the risk of penalising areas that need the most support.

The chief executive of NHS Providers, Chris Hopson, said the announcement of the reviews was ‘encouraging’.

But he said: ‘Senior health service leaders have about a month in which to make a decision on whether there is sufficient capacity in the NHS to deal with next winter’s risks, and if not, to do something about it.

‘We have called for a £350 million investment now to cope with pressures in the coming winter.’

The director of policy and strategy of NHS Providers, Saffron Cordery added that ‘penalties should be a last resort’ for areas that fall short.

She said: ‘We share the government’s desire to ensure that social care work effectively.

‘However we would urge the government to consider first how we support local health and social care systems to invest collectively in ways which reduce the pressure on wider health services and deliver the best care possible for patients.’

David Behan, chief executive of the CQC, said: ‘Our intention is that the review findings will highlight what is working well and where there are opportunities for improving how the system works, enabling the sharing of good practice and identifying where additional support is needed to secure better outcomes for people using services.’

The CQC has said that a further eight sites for review will be identified in the coming months and once all 20 reviews have been completed the watchdog will publish a national report of key findings and recommendations.

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