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NHS trust regulatory fees to increase by £65k from April


10 March 2017

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Some NHS trusts will see their CQC regulatory fees increase by over £65,000 in 2017/18, the healthcare regulator has announced today.

Due to a budget squeeze of £32m by 2019/20, the CQC is increasing fees from April 2017 to recover costs of their regulation, following a consultation last year.

The amounts that providers will pay for their regulation will depend on the type of health or social care they offer and how close their sector is to already meeting the cost of their regulation in full.

Some NHS trusts will see their CQC regulatory fees increase by over £65,000 in 2017/18, the healthcare regulator has announced today.

Due to a budget squeeze of £32m by 2019/20, the CQC is increasing fees from April 2017 to recover costs of their regulation, following a consultation last year.

The amounts that providers will pay for their regulation will depend on the type of health or social care they offer and how close their sector is to already meeting the cost of their regulation in full.

Trusts with an income of between £125m to £225m will see the highest increase at £65,375, bringing the total fee up to £202,239 per year.

Single-location GP practice with 5,001-10,000 patients will see a 76% increase in their fee and will have to pay a total of £4,526 each year.

Care homes with 26-30 residents have to pay £163 more, while single-location community social care providers will have to pay an extra £823 to the CQC.

Single-location dental practices, however, will be paying £113 less each year from April.

In 2015/16, the CQC’s budget was £249 million but the budget will be reduced to £217 million by 2019/20.

In a statement, the CQC added that they made over £10 million in efficiency savings in 2016/17.

The CQC said Government policy is requiring the CQC to move towards full chargeable cost recovery (FCCR) for all health and adult social care providers in England that it regulates.

Over the last few years, CQC’s fees have been increasing and grant-in-aid reducing to achieve this for all sectors.

David Behan, chief executive of the CQC, said: ‘The public are entitled to health and care which is safe, effective, high-quality and compassionate.

‘All providers of health and care must be registered in order to provide services. CQC provides the public with independent assurance that services are operating in their interests. The fee paid by providers is the charge for being registered with CQC.’

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