This site is intended for health professionals only

Obesity-related admissions double in four years

Obesity-GettyImages-dv1554016.jpg

By lealegraien@cogora.com
5 April 2018

Share this story:
Twitter
LinkedIn

Obesity-related admissions have more than doubled in four year, NHS Digital figures have shown.

Between 2012/13 and 2016/17, hospital admissions where obesity was a factor rose by 53% – from 292,404 to 617,000.

Where obesity was a primary diagnosis, the number of hospital admissions increased by 93% from 2016/17 and 1996/97 – 10,705 compared to 738 – according to NHS Digital data.

‘Unsustainable strain’

Obesity-related admissions have more than doubled in four year, NHS Digital figures have shown.

Between 2012/13 and 2016/17, hospital admissions where obesity was a factor rose by 53% – from 292,404 to 617,000.

Where obesity was a primary diagnosis, the number of hospital admissions increased by 93% from 2016/17 and 1996/97 – 10,705 compared to 738 – according to NHS Digital data.

‘Unsustainable strain’

Obesity Health Alliance (OHA) lead Caroline Cerny told Healthcare Leader that ‘dealing with rising levels of disease is putting an unsustainable strain on our already over stretched health service’.

She continued: ‘As weight increases, so do the chances of developing serious life threatening conditions like Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

‘This data is a stark reminder of exactly why we need measures like the forthcoming Soft Drinks Levy.

‘But it’s clear that this alone won’t be enough to tackle rising obesity levels so we need the Government to take further action to create a healthier environment for all, starting with tougher new rules to limit junk food advertising.’

Reducing sugar consumption

In the 2016 Budget, former Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne announced the implementation of a sugar tax on soft drinks – the Soft Drinks Industry Levy coming into force on 6 April – in a bid to reduce sugar consumption.

Research published in the Lancet journal suggested that a soft drink levy could prevent obesity in nearly 145,000 adults and children, out of a total of more than 15 millions, and lead to 19,000 fewer cases of Type 2 diabetes each year.

Diabetes UK director of policy, campaigns and improvement Bridget Turner said that reformulation and price increases will ‘both have an impact’ on people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, as ‘many use high sugar products to treat hypoglycaemia’.

She added: ‘People with diabetes who use sugary drinks to treat hypoglycaemia should be sure to read the labels to check the sugar content.

‘That said, there are clear health benefits to the whole population if we are all able to reduce the amount of free sugar in our diet. This policy will go some way to helping make this possible.’

Twitter
LinkedIn