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Parkinson’s nurse cuts may cost NHS £35m


19 July 2011

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A Parkinson's support and research charity has claimed that reducing the number of nurses dedicated to caring for sufferers in England could see the NHS paying out more than £35m per year.

A £19.5m burden in extra admissions and demands on the time of consultants could emerge from cutting nurses in the community, and the NHS could shell out £15.6m annually due to patients staying in wards longer, according to the Parkinson's UK report.

A Parkinson's support and research charity has claimed that reducing the number of nurses dedicated to caring for sufferers in England could see the NHS paying out more than £35m per year.

A £19.5m burden in extra admissions and demands on the time of consultants could emerge from cutting nurses in the community, and the NHS could shell out £15.6m annually due to patients staying in wards longer, according to the Parkinson's UK report.

The charity, which said the NHS would save an extra £7.1m with 60 more nurses, has begun campaigning to protect frontline jobs.

A Parkinson's support and research charity has claimed that reducing the number of nurses dedicated to caring for sufferers in England could see the NHS paying out more than £35m per year.

A £19.5m burden in extra admissions and demands on the time of consultants could emerge from cutting nurses in the community, and the NHS could shell out £15.6m annually due to patients staying in wards longer, according to the Parkinson's UK report.

The charity, which said the NHS would save an extra £7.1m with 60 more nurses, has begun campaigning to protect frontline jobs.

Parkinson's UK study said 19% of nurses revealed a caseload of more than 700 sufferers, but the average recommended caseload recommended by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) is 300.

The Department of Health said its plans for NHS modernisation will give clinicians "real power" as they work with clinical experts to shape services responding to community needs.

Copyright © Press Association 2011

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