This site is intended for health professionals only

Pension reforms risk doctor ‘compassion fatigue’


4 January 2012

Share this story:
Twitter
LinkedIn

Continuedattacks on NHS workers’ contracts and pensions risks the onset of “compassionfatigue” among doctors and nurses, warned a BMA leader.

In his New Yearmessage to members, Chair of the British Medical Association (BMA) Scotland Dr BrianKeighley, criticised MPs for their constant “blaming” of doctors.

He urged MPs towork more closely with the medical profession to overcome the financialchallenges facing the NHS in 2012.


Continued attacks on NHS workers’ contracts and pensions risks the onset of “compassion fatigue” among doctors and nurses, warned a BMA leader.

In his New Year message to members, Chair of the British Medical Association (BMA) Scotland Dr Brian Keighley, criticised MPs for their constant “blaming” of doctors.

He urged MPs to work more closely with the medical profession to overcome the financial challenges facing the NHS in 2012.

“Maintaining a sustainable and high quality NHS in the current financial climate will require an open and informed dialogue about the true cost of delivering health services and the priorities for the allocation of NHS resources,” said Dr Keighley.

“Doctors working on the ground in both primary and secondary care…must be engaged both nationally and locally in making key decisions on where efficiencies can be made with the least impact to quality of care and patient safety.”

Dr Keighley said the drive to make further savings amid budget cuts has lead to doctors’ goodwill being pushed to “breaking point”.

While he conceded the NHS pensions scheme reform may deliver short-term savings, Dr Keighley said the long-term consequences will mean patient care will be damaged as many doctors may choose to retire early.

Twitter
LinkedIn