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Seven health innovations could save £18.5bn for NHS, says think-tank


By Carolyn Wickware
2 June 2017

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Seven new ways of providing care could save the NHS £18.5bn by 2030, according to a new think-tank report.

The research conducted by the International Longevity Centre – UK found that seven global and UK-based services could save both the NHS and social care services substantial amounts of money.

But the authors said the UK ‘is not doing enough’ to implement new ways of working.

Seven new ways of providing care could save the NHS £18.5bn by 2030, according to a new think-tank report.

The research conducted by the International Longevity Centre – UK found that seven global and UK-based services could save both the NHS and social care services substantial amounts of money.

But the authors said the UK ‘is not doing enough’ to implement new ways of working.

The seven innovations include a programme at Manchester Royal Infirmary’s dialysis programme that provides patients with training and equipment so they can perform their own treatment at home.

The programme has already saved £1m for 70 patients and with 50,000 patients receiving treatment for incurable kidney failure, the report estimates a national saving of £5.6bn by 2030.

In Staffordshire, 162 GPs are running an integrated dementia service across 41 practices that has reduced the dementia diagnosis time from three years to four weeks and could save up to £38m between 2019 and 2030.

Sally-Marie Bamford, research and strategy director, ILC-UK said social care has ‘played second fiddle’ to the NHS for too long and is having a knock-on effect in terms of NHS sustainability.

She said: ‘Within the NHS, too many funding mechanisms still do not reward or encourage innovation, with payments too often based on output and not outcome, and Clinical Commissioning Group funding regulations discouraging the bold moves needed to create long-term cost savings, whilst still maintaining high levels of quality.

An NHS Clinical Commissioners spokesperson said: 'Since the 2012 Act created CCGs, they have been working hard to join up patient pathways and develop new and innovative approaches to plan and commission services for patients. 

'Sharing the learning from their work and spreading best practice is crucial to ensuring clinically led commissioning succeeds for patients and the system as a whole.  

'As their membership organisation NHSCC plays an important role in helping this to happen, for example through producing case study reports showcasing best practice from across our CCG members, as we’ve recently done in relation to collaborative working between CCGs and AHSNs, excellence in commissioning diabetes services, early intervention in mental health and encouraging local growth.'

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